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(c)CMcGuireKSpr2011_0013

Environmental Studies

Fieldwork 2The concentration in environmental studies is based upon the recognition that environmental and resource problems are not just biological, geological, economic, or political.  Therefore, the concentration is structured as an interdisciplinary study by selecting appropriate courses from the natural and social sciences, as well as the humanities, in order to pool knowledge from across traditional disciplinary lines.  This information is essential for an interdisciplinary assessment, analysis and evaluation of environmental problems. 


The concentration in environmental studies is open to students regardless of their majors and prepares students for graduate work and/or careers in a variety of areas including resource economics and management, city and regional planning, natural resource conservation, aquatic or terrestrial environments, environmental law, environmental education, environmental journalism, public administration, agribusiness, and food and population. For general advice and effective planning of their schedules, all students desiring this concentration are encouraged to see one of the directors as early as possible, preferably no later than the sophomore year.


Students interested in environmental studies are urged to keep this interest in mind when selecting a site for study abroad. If approved ahead of time by the codirectors, up to one course from study abroad can count toward the completion of the concentration. Moreover, pursuing these interests abroad emphasizes the important international dimensions of many environmental issues while often permitting students to gain familiarity with some problems (and their possible solutions) in other countries. Courses from study abroad sites in Costa Rica, Ecuador, Kenya, and Thailand are particularly suitable.


For general advice and effective planning of their schedules, all students desiring this concentration are encouraged to see one of the directors as early as possible, preferably no later than the sophomore year.